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Can food-based strategies help reduce vitamin A and iron deficiencies? a review of recent evidence by Marie T. Ruel

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Published by International Food Policy Research Institute in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Vitamin A deficiency -- Developing countries.,
  • Iron deficiency diseases -- Developing countries.,
  • Nutrition policy -- Developing countries.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. [53]-63).

StatementMarie T. Ruel.
SeriesFood policy review -- 5.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsRA645.V56 R84 2001, RA645.V56 R84 2001
The Physical Object
Pagination63 p. ;
Number of Pages63
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18186998M
ISBN 100896295044
LC Control Number2002022203

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Ruel, M.T. Can food-based strategies help reduce vitamin A and iron deficiencies? A review of recent evidence. International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington, DC, USA, Get this from a library! Can food-based strategies help reduce vitamin A and iron deficiencies?: a review of recent evidence. [Marie T Ruel]. Can food-based strategies help reduce vitamin A and iron. (). Global prevalence of vitamin A deficiency. Micronutrient Deficiency Information System Working Paper 2. (). Identification and production of local carotene-rich foods to combat vitamin A malnutrition. (). Improvement of dietary density by the use of germinated cereals and legumes. (). Iron deficiency: Contemporary scientific.

Food-based strategies to control vitamin A deficiency and to ensure optimal functioning of the immune sys-tem, growth, and development. Prevalence of vitamin A deficiency Vitamin A deficiency is a problem of public health sig-nificance in over 70 countries. It is prevalent in parts of most countries in Africa and Asia and in some ar-. These steps can lead to nutrient-dense fish being used in food-based strategies to combat vitamin A and mineral deficiencies. The work we have done in Bangladesh and Cambodia also has relevance for addressing nutrient deficiencies in poor population groups in Africa, for example those living in . Even small production of the vitamin A-rich fish mola in ponds in Bangladesh can meet the annual vitamin A recommendation of 2 million children, and a traditional daily meal with the iron-rich. How well we absorb Vitamin D from food varies depending on our age, lifestyle and health, so there is no one-size-fits-all prescription. The Vitamin D Council recommends we take 2, IU daily if we get little sun. But if you are Vitamin D deficient, your wellness doctor may recommend 5, to 10, IU of D3 for a month until you get up to par.

Ruel, M. T. (). Can food based strategies help reduce vitamin A and iron deficiencies? A review of recent evidences. International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Washington D.C. vicious cycle of malnutrition, underdevelopment and poverty. Food-based approaches, which include food production, dietary diversification and food fortification, are sustainable strategies for improving the micronutrient status of populations and raising levels of nutrition. Combating Micronutrient Deficiencies: Food-based Approaches. decade iodine and vitamin A deficiencies (and) to reduce substantially other important micronutrient deficiencies, including iron’ (1).The ICN Plan of Action for Nutrition (2) includes strategies specifically to address the prevention and control of micronutrient deficiencies and gives high priority to food-based . Title(s): Can food-based strategies help reduce vitamin A and iron deficiencies?: a review of recent evidence/ Marie T. Ruel. Country of Publication: United States Publisher: Washington, D.C.: International Food Policy Research Institute, c